anita anand


Author and Translator

“Anand’s writing—natural, inquisitive and generously circumstantial—gives gravitas to our individual abnormalities.” –Anupa Mistry, National Post

"(...) the arrival of an exciting new talent." –Dennis Bock, author of The Communist's Daughter

“This is an impressive first collection.” –Toronto Star

Winner, 2015 QWF Concordia University First Book Award

Finalist for the 2018 John Glassco Translation Prize.


Fiction

Swing in the House and Other Stories (Véhicule Press 2015). Winner of the QWF First Book Award


TRANSLATION

Nirliit, a novel by Julianna Léveillé-Trudel translated by Anita Anand. Véhicule Press, 2018.
Finalist for the 2018 John Glassco Translation Prize.


About

Anita Anand was born in Montreal. She moved back and forth...

Fiction


Winner, 2015 QWF Concordia University First Book Award

49th Shelf Most Anticipated 2015 Spring Fiction Selection

Nominated for the Blue Metropolis/Conseil des arts de Montréal Literary Diversity Prize for a First Publication.

Shortlisted for the 2016 Re-Lit Award


“Anand’s writing—natural, inquisitive and generously circumstantial—gives gravitas to our individual abnormalities. She exhumes the truth found in the liminality of life, as if saying what you experience is not the same as what I experience but we are both drowning in the same invisible panic.” - Anupa Mistry, National Post

“Full of sparely drawn yet complex characters, and situations that are equal parts poignant and absurd, these stories repeatedly demonstrate a rare knack for tackling heavy subjects—race and racism, identity, infidelity, mental illness—without heavy-handedness.” - Ian McGillis, Montreal Gazette

“In all of her stories, Anand shows a keen awareness and desire to begin conversations about identity politics and thinly-veiled aggressions and prejudices, especially as they relate to intimate relationships. Overall, this collection is cohesive and rhythmic, and showcases a unique, perceptive, and sensitive narrative voice.” - Jess Shane, Broken Pencil

“This is an impressive first collection.” - Toronto Star

“This is a wise, assured and wonderfully intelligent collection that announces the arrival of an exciting new talent.” - Dennis Bock, author of Going Home Again

“These stories have this quiet fire, these cool fire surprises, stylish moves done deftly by a writer with light touch and dark intentions.” - Cary Tennis, author of Citizens of the Dream

“These stories are full of undercurrents that disturb the surface, and these disturbances, in their turn, dazzle as they reflect light.” - Elise Moser, author of Lily and Taylor and Because I Have Loved and Hidden It.

"Anand has a fine sensibility and an ear not just for dialogue, but also for situation – for parsing the almost invisible shifts in dynamic and power that happen between ordinary people." - Anna Leventhal, Montreal Review of Books.
"Swing in the House shows Anand's remarkable talent for observing people in their natural habitats, and her ability to put that on the page without losing anything in translation is mind blowing" - Nicole Brewer, Parenthetical.

Translation


Finalist for the 2018 John Glassco Translation Prize.

A young woman from Montreal follows the geese to the Inuit North in this deeply-felt witnessing of contemporary Indigenous life, as shaped by decades of colonial rule and government neglect. Having worked in the North for years, Juliana Léveillé-Trudel offers a portrait of a people undaunted by institutionalized racism, but in many cases broken by domestic violence, corporate mining, and the corrupting presence of summer workers up from the South in search of big paycheques. Delivered across two searing monologues, Nirliit is a testament to a people’s perseverance as much as it is an apology by those who inflicted those circumstances upon them. Léveillé-Trudel transcends historical divisions to make a meaningful, individual connection.

About


Anita Anand was born in Montreal. She moved back and forth between her hometown and such places as the Bronx; Bedfordshire, England; and Richmond, B.C. In every neighbourhood where she has lived, she has been the only person her age of Indian origin. Her writing has appeared in The Globe and Mail, Frostwriting and the Louisiana Review.